Places to See & Beaches on Kefalonia



When I was a teenager I remember reading Gerald Durrells' book: My Family and Other Animals, set in Corfu. At the time I'd never been anywhere near Greece but from the day I read that lovely book I wanted to visit Greece, and more particularly Corfu, with all my being.

Many years later I finally visited Cofu and was disappointed.

I had this idea of what a Greek island should be from the book and this wasn't it. Corfu had changed beyond recognition and was way too commercial.

Later I visited Mykonos, Santorini and other “typical” Greek islands. Yes, they were all beautiful but they weren't the Greece I'd dreamed about. The Greece I'd found in Gerald Durrell's books.

It was only when I visited Kefalonia (also called Cephalonia) that I found the Greece I'd always wanted to find.

Beaches on KefaloniaMyrtos Beach on Kefalonia

Funny thing was, my wife Maria found the Greece she'd been dreaming of too, the Greece she'd discovered in the book Captain Corelli's Mandolin. We only later learned that the movie was actually filmed here.

That's not to say that parts of the island aren't the typical touristy Greece found on other islands; the difference here is that outside of Argostoli and Lixouri it's the “real” Greece.

Where to Stay/What to Visit?

Asos VillageAssos Village

Unless you want the 24 hour nightlife and drinking/partying that goes on in the main resorts I'd suggest you stay in Assos, at either the Romanza Studios or Assos View.

Assos is far away from the chaos of the main resort towns and not far from Myrtos Beach (the most spectacularly beautiful beach on the island) but you will need a car to explore properly.  

For me Assos is the Greece of the Gerald Durrell books; the Greece I've long sought. The Greece of shady olive grooves, white houses with red roofs, tavernas with large and lively owners and fishing boats bobbing in blue seas. It's a Greece I challenge you not to fall in love with.

If you can't get into Assos then my next choice would be the fishing village of Fiskardo, a beautiful little seaside town. Although it does seem to be getting more popular with tourists it is still unspoiled. Visit outside of July and August to enjoy it at its best.

Beaches on Kefalonia

Myrtos Beach

Beach of Myrtos

This is the most stunning of all the beaches on Kefalonia but not for children as the sea-bed slopes quickly down making wading and splashing in the shallows dangerous for little ones.

Currents can also be fairly strong because of the rip-tide, although this is not a problem for someone who can swim quite well it will be for young children. On certain days, when the sea is not clear, it may even be too strong for adults.

The beach is made up of tiny pebbles near the waterline and bigger ones further back so sandals are a good idea.  Also bring an umbrella or hire one (expensive) as there isn't any shade, except for a few caves which locals say are best avoided because of the danger of rock falls.

Despite there being a little snack kiosk on the beach rather bring food and water with you as it often seems to be closed for long periods for no fathomable reason. When it does open they charge enough to make up for their loss of sales when closed.

Prepare for a long day as you'll want to catch the sunset here before you head home. Many say it is the most beautiful in Greece.

Getting to the Beach

The best way to get to the beach is to take the road from Divarata village. The views are incredible on the way down.

Beaches for Children

If you're looking for good beaches on Kefalonia that are suitable for families then Antisamos beach is a better choice than Myrtos and it is beautiful too. Antisamos was the beach featured in the Captain Corelli's Mandolin movie.

Also worth considering is the sandy red beach of Xi, actually the sand is more like red clay but it is fun to play about in and it's good for the skin too. I made myself a facial mudpack and now look ten years younger :-) The waters are not deep, unlike most of the island's beaches, this makes it ideal for little ones who want to splash about in the shallows.

Melissani Grotto

Melissani CaveMelissani Cave

Apart from the beaches and towns, one other thing you really must see is the Melissani Grotto – Kefalonia's answer to the Blue Grotto on the Isle of Capri. You can access the cave by foot but I'd recommend you go by boat  - they are always there, waiting at the end of the pier near the caves entrance.

The boats take you into the lake that is within the cave, wild vegetation grows along the sides and the sun shines in through openings high above. It seems like another world, another age.  Some great dinosaur bird swooping down from above wouldn't have looked out of place.  

My Tip: Make sure you are inside the cave at midday, which is when the sun shines through the openings above and turns the water turquoise. 

Walking & Driving

Otherwise just explore on your own and make your own discoveries. Walking is the best way to really understand the island so get yourself a copy of Kefalonia (Walk and Eat) before you leave home.

Even though walking is great, you'll still need a car to discover all the island can offer – try to book it before you arrive on the island for the best rates. I'd suggest giving Auto Europe a try - they guarantee the cheapest rates in Greece. 

When to Visit Kefalonia

If you want warm weather without so many other tourists then June and September are best. You won't get much rain in either month.

My favourite month of all though is May. What's so great about May? A number of reasons really, here's a few:

  • It's a little cooler but I've still had many a day of 27C (80 °F), without the stifling humidity of July/August and there is little rain.
  • There are few tourists around
  • The island is lush green after the winter rains and the combination of emerald landscapes and turquoise seascapes is breath-taking.

Getting to Kefalonia

Flights leave from most countries in Europe directly to the island. The two main airlines flying the route are Ryan Air and Easy Jet. 

The other alternative is to get a ferry over from the Greek mainland or from Italy (Ferries leave from Brindisi and Bari)

Map



› Beaches on Kefalonia


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